💭 Reflect on Student Writing

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Part 1: Reflect and Write

Using the prompts provided below, please write and submit a reflection on your current practice, focusing on the aspects of persuasive writing you and your students find difficult. Only the first question is required. Don’t feel as though you need to answer all of the questions below; just focus on those you find most compelling. Time spent reflecting on your current practice will help you get the most out of this lesson.

  • Describe the kinds of argumentative writing tasks that you assign to your students. What are students asked to argue for or against? (Required)
  • What aspects of argumentative writing do students find most difficult? (The more specific you can be here, the more effectively you will be able to use what you learn in this course to help them improve their writing). 
  • What criteria do you use to assess argumentative writing assignments? (How aware are your students of these criteria?) 
  • How do your students currently get feedback on their writing? How frequent is the feedback? How timely? To what extent do students take feedback into account when revising a draft?
  • Do you use any kind of peer review process to help students improve their writing? Why or why not? Does your peer review process work? How do you know? 

    When you’re ready, drop your reflection in the course chat function.

    Suggested length: 100-150 words

Part 2: Read and Plan

Read over this sheet, which describes how you can use argument mapping to help students plan essays.

Consider the kinds of arguments you ask your students to write. Choose a writing assignment that you plan to give your students (or have already given them). Use MindMup to develop a short model essay outline that answers the prompt in the assignment. Identify a main claim that a student in your class might argue for, and map at least three different reasons to believe that claim. Support your reasons with at least three pieces of evidence from your class texts or other resources. (You might refer to this sample template or these sample outlines to get a better idea of what this might look like.) 

Now, rewrite your prompt to outline how students should use argument mapping to plan their own essays. Be clear about where and how students should be using mapping software in the writing process. 

If you have questions or would like feedback on your lesson plan, send your course facilitators a message in that chat and we will be happy to help!